Migraine Headaches and Nutrition Approaches

15 Jul

People with migraines know all too well about that throbbing, pulsating, and nauseated feeling that accompanies their headaches and the associated disability that often results. The underlying cause of migraine headaches is still not well understood, but genetics (family history), chemical imbalances in the brain (serotonin, in particular), environmental factors (weather, allergens), and hormonal changes appear to play a part. Because medications to manage headaches can come with potentially serious side effects, especially with prolonged use, many patients opt for non-pharmaceutical treatment approaches to reduce the frequency and intensity of their migraines…

A 2018 survey of 4,356 American adults with a history of migraines found that common symptoms associated with migraines include sensitivity to touch (32%), food cravings (28%), and hallucinations (18%), which include sound and smell. The most common foods to trigger a migraine were chocolate at 75%, cheese (especially aged cheeses) at 48%, citrus fruit at 30%, and alcohol (especially red wine) at 25%. Other foods that may be triggers include cured meats, monosodium glutamate (MSG), aspartame (and other artificial sweeteners), snack foods, fatty foods, dairy products, food dyes, coffee, tea, cola, and nuts.

According to a 2019 study, people who suffer from migraines are often deficient in magnesium (Mg), a mineral naturally found in spinach, nuts, and whole grains. Magnesium is also important in regulating blood pressure, blood sugar (glucose), and muscle and nerve function. A meta-review of previous study findings revealed that migraine patients who received a Mg supplement reported reductions in both headache frequency and intensity. Other benefits included a decrease in hospitalization during pregnancy, and at a higher dose, a lower incidence of type-2 diabetes and stroke!

Another nutritional anti-migraine option includes the use of fever few (Tanacetum parthenium) for both prevention and treatment of migraine headaches. Other benefits of fever few include fever reduction, irregular menstrual cycles, arthritis, psoriasis, allergies, asthma, tinnitus, dizziness, and nausea/vomiting. There is also research support for the use of riboflavin (vitamin B-2), melatonin and coenzyme Q10 by migraine patients.

Doctors of chiropractic often manage their migraine headache patients using a multi-modal approach that includes cervical spinal manipulation and mobilization, physical therapy modalities, home exercise training, nutritional counselling (including supplementation advice), and other conservative treatment approaches based on the patient’s specific needs.

 

This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all healthcare concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a healthcare professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.
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