Integrative Considerations during the COVID-19 pandemic

27 Mar

March 24, 2020

Greetings Friends, 

The following is advice from top experts in the natural medicine industry. I found the information here to be valuable and hope you do too. I have been following these health officials in addition to the resources being released by the W.H.O. Also, PA.Gov (or your corresponding state) is a valuable resource for checking on potential local breakouts. 

The importance of not only physical but also mental health should be acknowledged. Reducing or eliminating sensationalized media outlets from your mental diet will benefit your overall health. The WHO and state websites are more than proficient for your data acquisition. 

Particular attention should be given to WHAT NOT TO TAKE DURING INFECTION. Remember that symptoms of COVID-19 can be mild. But it is still important not to take anything that promotes it’s virulence in yourself and therefore the community at large. 

Here is the Integrative Health Strategy information that I currently recommend…

Using available in-vitro evidence, an understanding of the virulence of COVID-19, as well as data from similar, but different, viruses, we offer the following strategies to consider. Again, we stress that these are supplemental considerations to the current recommendations that emphasize regular hand washing, physical distancing, stopping non-essential travel, and getting tested if you develop symptoms. 

While the pathogenicity of COVID-19 is complex, it is important to understand the role of inflammation in this disease. The virulence and pathogenicity (including acute respiratory distress syndrome) associated with SARS corona viruses develops as the result of viral activation of cytoplasmic NLRP3 inflammasome. This inflammasome within activated (upregulated NFkB) macrophages and Th1 immune cells releases pro-inflammatory cytokines, namely IL-1B and IL- 18, which dictate the pathogenic inflammation responsible for the virulence and symptoms of COVID-19.1 Understanding this component of COVID-19 infection provides a mechanistic underpinning to several of the following.

RISK REDUCTION:
• Adequate sleep: Shorter sleep duration increases the risk of infectious illness. One study found that less than 5 hours of sleep (monitored over 7 consecutive days) increased the risk of developing rhinovirus associated cold by 350% (odds ratio [OR] = 4.50, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-18.69) when compared to individuals who slept at least 7 hours per night.2 Important to COVID-19, sleep deprivation increases CXCL9 levels. CXCL9 is a monokine, induced by interferon, and which increases lymphocytic infiltration,3 and which is implicated in NLRP3 inflammasome activation.4 Adequate sleep also ensures the secretion of melatonin, a molecule which may play a role in reducing coronavirus virulence (see Melatonin below).
 Stress management: Psychological stress disrupts immune regulation and is specifically associated with increased pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-65 Acute stress in mice increases IL-1B via NLRP3 inflammasome activation.6 Various mindfulness techniques such as meditation, breathing exercises, guided imagery, etc. reduce stress, reduce activated NFkB, may reduce CRP and do not appear to increase inflammatory cytokines.7 
• Zinc: Coronavirus appears to be susceptible to the viral inhibitory actions of zinc. Zinc may prevent coronavirus entry into cells8 and appears to reduce coronavirus virulence.9 Typical daily dosing of zinc is 15mg – 30mg daily with lozenges potentially providing direct protective effects in the upper respiratory tract.
• Vegetables and Fruits +/- isolated Flavonoids: Many flavonoids have been found, in vitro, to reduce NLRP3 inflammasome signaling, and consequently NFkB, TNF-a, IL-6, IL-1B and IL-18 expression.10

Some of the specific flavonoids which have been shown to have this effect, and which can be found in the diet and/or dietary supplements include: 

  •  baicalin11 and wogonoside12 from Scutellaria baicalensis (Chinese skullcap);
  •  liquiritigenin13 from Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice)
  • dihydroquercetin14 and quercetin15 found in onions and apples. Of note, quercetin also functions as a zinc ionophore, chelating zinc and transporting it into the cell cytoplasm.16 This could, theoretically, enhance the anti-viral actions of zinc.
  •  myricetin17 found in tomatoes, oranges, nuts, and berries
  • oapigenin18 (found in Matricaria recutita (Chamomile), parsley and celery.
  • ocurcumin19,20 (found in turmeric root)
  • epigallocatechine gallate (EGCG) from green tea. EGCG has been found to have antiviral activity against a wide range of DNA and RNA viruses, especially in the early stages of infection by preventing viral attachment, entry and membrane fusion.21 EGCG, link quercetin, is a zinc ionophore22, thereby potentially enhancing the antiviral actions of zinc.

At least 5 – 7 servings of vegetables and 2-3 servings of fruit daily provide a repository of flavonoids and are considered a cornerstone of an anti-inflammatory diet.

 Vitamin C: Like flavonoids, ascorbic acid inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activation.23 Clinical trials have found that vitamin C shortens the frequency, duration and severity of the common cold and the incidence of pneumonia.24 Typical daily dosing of vitamin C ranges from 500mg to 3000mg daily with even higher doses utilized during times of
acute infection.

• Melatonin: Melatonin has been shown to inhibit NFkB activation and NLRP3 inflammasome activation.25 In fact, the age-related decline in melatonin production is one proposed mechanism to explain why children do not appear to have severe symptoms and older adults do. Melatonin also reduces oxidative lung injury and inflammatory cell recruitment during viral infections.26 Typical dosing of melatonin varies widely from 0.3mg to 20mg (the latter used in the oncological setting).

• Sambucus nigra (Elderberry): There is preclinical evidence that elderberry inhibits replication and viral attachment of Human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63)27, different than COVID-19, but a member of the coronavirus family. Sambucus appears most effective in the prevention or early stage of corona virus infections.28
******Of note, Sambucus significantly increases inflammatory cytokines, including IL-B129 so should be discontinued with symptoms of infection (or positive test). An evidence-based systematic review of elderberry conducted by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration concluded that there is level B evidence to support the use of elderberry for influenza30 which may or may not be applicable to COVID-19 prevention. Typical dosing of 2:1 elderberry extract is 10mL -60mL daily for adults and 5mL-30mL daily for children.

• Vitamin D: In certain conditions, vitamin D has been found to decrease NLRP3 inflammasome activation31 and vitamin D receptor activation reduces IL-1b secretion.32 However, 1,25(OH)vitamin D has also been found to increase IL-1b levels,33,34 and should, therefore, be used with caution and perhaps discontinued with symptoms of infection.

DURING SYMPTOMS OF INFECTION OR POSITIVE TEST FOR COVID-19:
To Avoid: Given the integral role of inflammatory cytokines (namely IL-1B and IL-18) in the pathogenicity of COVID-19, as well as the impossibility of predicting which individuals are susceptible to the “cytokine storm”, technically called secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, or sHLH, it appears to be prudent to avoid high and regular use of immunostimulatory agents that increase these cytokines.

Again, in the absence of human clinical data, caution is warranted with the following immune-activating agents due to preclinical evidence of increased IL-1B and/or IL-18 production in infected immune cells:
! Sambucus nigra (Elderberry)35
! Isolated polysaccharide extracts from medicinal mushrooms or mycelium36,37
! Echinacea angustifolia and E. purpurea38,39
! Larch arabinogalactan40
! Supplemental vitamin D41,42


Likely Safe: Other commonly used natural immunostimulatory and antiviral agents including the following do not appear to increase IL-1B or IL-18 as a part of their immunomodulatory actions. Several of these, in fact, reduce these cytokines and may restore immune homeostasis. These are, therefore, likely safe to use both prior to, and during, COVID-19 infection. Whether these agents mitigate the symptoms or virulence of COVID-19 is unknown and therefore the benefit of these agents during COVID-19 infection is unknown.
• Allium sativum (garlic)
• Quercetin
• Astragalus membranaceus
• Mycelium mushroom extracts as well as fruiting body extract of Agaricus blazeii49
• Mentha piperita (peppermint)
• Andrographis paniculata
• Green tea and green tea extracts
• Zinc
• Vitamin A [note: This study found that 25,000iu daily for 4 months in 84 women resulted in lower serum IL-1b and IL-1b/IL-4 ratios in obese women. Oral vitamin A can causes hypervitaminosis A especially at doses greater than 25,000 IU daily for more than 6 years or 100,000iu daily for more than 6 months. Monitoring liver function tests for hepatotoxicity during vitamin A dosing of any duration, even at lower doses, is advised given variable individual sensitivity.]
• Vitamin C

The information and understanding of COVID-19 continue to change rapidly. We encourage you to make integrative recommendations carefully and with consideration of the underlying mechanisms of both the COVID-19 infection and the intended intervention. It is also important to reiterate that there are no clinically evidence-based integrative prevention or treatment strategies for COVID-19 infection. 

Lise Alschuler ND
Professor of Clinical Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine Assistant Director, Fellowship in Integrative Medicine,
Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine

Reviewed by:
Ann Marie Chiasson MD
Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine
Director, Fellowship in Integrative Medicine, Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine

Robert Crocker MD
Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine
Director, Strategic and Clinical Planning and Implementation,

Andrew Weil Center for
Integrative Medicine3

Randy Horwitz MD PhD FACP
Professor of Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine
Medical Director,

Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine
Victoria Maizes MD
Professor of Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine and Public Health, University of Arizona

Andrew Weil Endowed Chair in Integrative Medicine
Executive Director, Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine

Paul Stamets
Mycologist

Andrew Weil MD
Professor of Medicine and Public Health, University of Arizona
Endowed Chair in Integrative Rheumatology, University of Arizona
Founder,

Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine
Media inquires please contact Keith LaBaw, Manager, AWCIM Marketing at
klabaw@arizona.edu

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23 Choe J-Y, et al. Quercetin and Ascorbic Acid Suppress Fructose-Induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation by
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27 Weng J-R, et al. Antiviral Activity of Sambucus FormosanaNakai Ethanol Extract and Related Phenolic Acid
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28 Chen C, et al. Sambucus Nigra Extracts Inhibit Infectious Bronchitis Virus at an Early Point During Replication.
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29 Barak V, et al. The Effect of Sambucol, a Black Elderberry-Based, Natural Product, on the Production of Human
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31 Lu L, et al. Vitamin D 3 Protects Against Diabetic Retinopathy by Inhibiting High-Glucose-Induced Activation of
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32 Rao Z, et al. Vitamin D Receptor Inhibits NLRP3 Activation by Impeding Its BRCC3-Mediated Deubiquitination.
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33 Verway M, et al. Vitamin D Induces interleukin-1β Expression: Paracrine Macrophage Epithelial Signaling
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36 Yang Y, et al. Protein-bound polysaccharide-K induces IL-1β via TLR2 and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Innate
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42 Tulk SE, et al. Vitamin D3 Metabolites Enhance the NLRP3-dependent Secretion of IL-1β From Human THP-1
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46 Li H, et al. Astragaloside Inhibits IL-1β-induced Inflammatory Response in Human Osteoarthritis Chondrocytes
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54 Han Y-S, et al. Papain-like Protease 2 (PLP2) From Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV):
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55 Farhangi MA, et al. Vitamin A Supplementation and Serum Th1- And Th2-associated Cytokine Response in
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57 Choe J-Y, et al. Quercetin and Ascorbic Acid Suppress Fructose-Induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation by
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