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Chiropractic for Neck Pain?… Really?

15 May

There have been MANY studies conducted on the benefits and efficacy of spinal manipulation to treat back pain—so much so that many medical doctors frequently refer patients with back pain to chiropractors for this service. But what about neck pain?

Although it’s taken a little longer to compile the evidence, there is now substantial research to support that spinal manipulation for neck pain is equally effective as it is for low back pain in regards to improving pain levels, function, and quality of life.

Multiple reviews and meta-analyses (studies that evaluate the research over a series of years) indicate that mobilization, manipulation, and exercise all work alone but appear to give the best long-term benefits when used in combination with each other.

In the acute and subacute stages of neck pain, studies show cervical manipulation is more effective than various combinations of analgesics, muscle relaxants, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for improving pain and function in both the short and intermediate term.

Studies show that thoracic or mid-back manipulation is also very helpful for patients with neck pain. Chiropractic approaches often include a combination of spinal manipulation, manual cervical traction, figure-8 mobilization, and deep tissue trigger point/active release forms of therapy.

As noted above, the inclusion of exercise yields the best long-term benefits, especially for chronic neck pain.

One such exercise is Cranio-cervical flexion (deep neck flexor strengthening): Tuck the chin inwards, pushing the mid part of the neck backward with or without resisting into your fingers/hands or a towel wrapped around the neck. A gradual crescendo of pressure followed by a gradual release (or decrescendo) works well!

Another great exercise is Fiber Stretching: Side-bend the head and neck while applying gentle over-pressure while simultaneously reaching downward with the opposite arm/hand, searching for tight muscle fibers. Try combining forward and backward rotations and chin glide head movements while applying the over-pressure/reach combinations, and work each tight fiber until it loosens up.

There are many other exercises your doctor of chiropractic can show you, but these are a great start!

FOR A FREE NO-OBLIGATION CONSULTATION CALL 717-697-1888

Dr. Brent Binder
856 Century Drive, Suite C
Mechanicsburg Pa, 17055

Member of Chiro-Trust.org

This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all healthcare concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a healthcare professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.

When Teenagers Get Headaches…

17 Apr

In 2016, researchers at Curtin University in Perth examined the seated posture and health data of 1,108 17-year olds in an effort to determine if any particular posture increased the risk of headaches/neck pain among late adolescents.

Among four posture subgroups—upright, intermediate, slumped thorax, and forward head—the researchers observed the following: participants who were slumped in their thoracic spine (mid-back region) and had their head forward when they sat were at higher odds of having mild, moderate, or severe depression; participants classified as having a more upright posture exercised more frequently, females were more likely to sit more upright than males; those who were overweight were more likely to sit with a forward neck posture; and taller people were more likely to sit upright.

While they found biopsychosocial factors like exercise frequency, depression, and body mass index (BMI) ARE associated with headaches and neck pain, their data did not suggest any one particular posture increased the risk of neck pain or headaches more than any other posture among the teenagers involved in the study.

This is noteworthy as studies with adults do indicate the risk for neck pain and headaches is greater in individuals with poor neck posture. In particular, postures such as forward head carriage, pinching a phone between the ear and shoulder, and prolonged neck/head rotation outside of neutral can all increase the risk of cervical disorders. This suggests that in younger bodies, the cause of neck pain and headaches may be multifactoral and not limited to just poor posture and that treatment must address all issues that may increase one’s risk for neck pain/headaches in order to reach a desired outcome.

The good news is that chiropractic has long embraced the biopsychosocial model of healthcare, looking at ALL factors that affect back and neck pain and quality of life. Through patient education, spinal manipulation, mobilization, exercise training, the use of modalities, and more, chiropractors can greatly help those struggling with neck pain and headaches!

FOR A FREE NO-OBLIGATION CONSULTATION CALL 717-697-1888

Dr. Brent Binder
856 Century Drive, Suite C
Mechanicsburg Pa, 17055
Member of Chiro-Trust.org

What Is Cervical Spondylosis?

16 Feb

Cervical spondylosis (CS) is another term for osteoarthritis (OA) of the neck. It is a common, age-related condition that you will probably develop if you live long enough. Or, if you suffered a neck injury as a youth, it can develop within five to ten years of the injury, depending on the severity.

It is basically caused by the “wear and tear” associated with normal daily living to which some refer to as “the natural history of degeneration.” According to the Mayo Clinic, CS or OA affects more than 85% of people over 60 years old, and that is probably a conservative estimate!

Common symptoms associated with CS/OA vary widely from no symptoms whatsoever to debilitating pain and stiffness. For example, when CS crowds the holes through which the nerves and/or spinal cord travel, it creates a condition called spinal stenosis that can result in numbness, tingling, and/or weakness. In severe cases, this can even affect bowel or bladder control (which is an EMERGENCY)!

CS occurs when the normal slippery, shiny cartilage surfaces of the joint(s) gradually thin and eventually wear away from excessive friction caused by years of repetitive use related to a job, sport, or just time. Bone spurs often form, which results from the body trying to stabilize an unstable joint. In some cases, the spurs can actually fuse a joint, which often helps reduce pain. (Bone spurs can also form if the intervertebral disks or shock-absorbing pads between the vertebrae are injured or become dehydrated due to arthritic conditions.)

Risk factors associated with CS include: aging, injury, years of heavy lift/carry job demands, and jobs and/or hobbies that require the neck to be outside of a neutral position (like years of pinching a phone between the ear and shoulder). Genetics and bad habits (like smoking) also play a role in CS. Obesity and inactivity also worsens the severity of CS symptoms.

The good news is that even though most of us will have CS, it is usually NOT a disabling condition. However, CS may interfere with our normal activities. Depending on its location, pain may feel worse in certain positions, like when sneezing or coughing or with movements like rotation or looking upwards.

Stiffness is a common symptom, which can vary with weather changes. Too little as well as too much activity can be a problem, but the BEST way to self-manage CS is to keep active! Range of motion exercises, strength training, and walking all help reduce the symptoms of CS.

Doctors of chiropractic are trained to identify CS/OA. Gentle manipulation, mobilization, nutritional counseling, exercise training, modalities (and more) can REALLY HELP!

FOR A FREE NO-OBLIGATION CONSULTATION CALL 717-697-1888

Dr. Brent Binder
856 Century Drive, Suite C
Mechanicsburg Pa, 17055

Member of Chiro-Trust.org

Head Tilt and Headaches – Are They Connected?

15 Dec

We’ve all seen people working on laptops in airports, airplanes, coffee shops, on the train, walking down the street…you name it! So how does this affect one’s neck, and does it contribute to headaches?

A 2016 study compared females with posture-induced headaches vs. healthy, age-matched female control subjects to see if there was any significant difference in their head-tilt and forward head position during laptop use.

The research team measured angles for maximum head protraction (chin-poking forwards), head-tilt, and forward head position at baseline (neutral resting) and while using a laptop. Essentially, they measured how “slumped” the participant’s posture was at rest vs. while working on a laptop.

The results showed that the headache group demonstrated an increased head protraction of 22.3% compared to the control group at rest. When comparing the ratio of forward head position during habitual sitting to the maximum head protraction, the researchers found a significant difference, which was also worse in the headache group. Similarly, laptop work head position was worse in the headache group.

The researchers concluded that the headache group showed worse posture at rest in the two measurements as well as more forward head posture during the laptop task than the control group. They recommended that management/therapy for patients with headaches and/or neck pain include posture retraining exercises as an important aspect of obtaining long-term successful outcomes.

This study illustrates the importance of that and the need to include exercises like chin-retractions, conscious head re-positioning, cervical traction (in some cases), deep neck flexor muscle strengthening, managing scapular stability, and more.

When looking at a person from the side, imagine a perpendicular line that passes through the ear canal should pass through the shoulder, hip, and ankle. In cases of forward head posture, that line will pass forwards of these bony landmarks.

Previous research shows that the head weighs an average of 12 pounds (5.44 kg), and for every inch of forward head positioning, the neck and upper back muscles are burdened with an extra 10 pounds (4.53 kg) of load to keep the head upright. That means a five-inch forward head position adds 50 pounds (22.67 kg) of weight to the neck and upper back area. It’s no wonder this faulty posture leads to chronic neck and headache complaints!

Spinal joint manipulation is one of the most patient-satisfying, fast-acting remedies for neck pain and headaches of several types offered by doctors of chiropractic. But when manipulation is combined with exercise training, studies show this combined approach results in the best long-term benefits or outcomes!

FOR A FREE NO-OBLIGATION CONSULTATION CALL 717-697-1888

Dr. Brent Binder
856 Century Drive, Suite C
Mechanicsburg Pa, 17055

Member of Chiro-Trust.org

How Does Neck Pain Cause Headaches?

15 Nov

Headaches can arise from many different causes. A partial list includes stress, lack of sleep, allergies, neck trauma (particularly sports injuries and car accidents), and more. In some cases, the cause may be unknown.

A unique common denominator of headaches has to do with cervical spine anatomy, in particular the upper part of the neck. There are seven cervical vertebrae, and the top three (C1-3) give rise to three nerves that travel into the head. These nerves also share a pain nucleus with the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve V), which can route pain signals to the brain.

Depending on which nerve is most irritated, the location of the headache can vary. For example, C2—the greater occipital nerve—travels up the back of the head to the top. From there, it can communicate with another nerve (cranial nerve V or the trigeminal nerve), which can refer pain to the forehead and/or behind the eye.

When C1—the lesser occipital nerve—is irritated, pain travels to the back of the head, while irritation to C3—the greater auricular nerve—results in pain to an area just above the ear. When a nerve is pinched, the altered sensation can include pain, numbness, tingling, burning, itching, aching, or a combination of these sensations.

These are classified as cervicogenic headaches (CGH), and as the name implies, the origin of pain/altered sensation arises from the neck.

A 2013 study reviewing the literature on CGH found that manipulation and mobilization improved pain, disability, and function. The most effective approach included manipulation combined with neck-upper back strengthening exercises.

But what about migraine headaches? Migraines are vascular headaches, and some (but not all) are preceded by an aura or a pre-headache warning that may include blurry vision, tingling, strange olfactory sensations, etc. One study of 127 migraine sufferers reported fewer attacks and less medication required by those who received chiropractic care.

The good news is that spinal manipulation is very safe, and a trial is often very rewarding for many types of headaches.

FOR A FREE NO-OBLIGATION CONSULTATION CALL 717-697-1888

Dr. Brent Binder
856 Century Drive, Suite C
Mechanicsburg Pa, 17055

Member of Chiro-Trust.org

A Deeper Look into Headaches

14 Sep

Headaches are REALLY common! In fact, two out of three children will have a headache by the time they are fifteen years old, and more than 90% of adults will experience a headache at some point in their life. It appears safe to say that almost ALL of us will have firsthand knowledge of what a headache is like sooner or later!

Certain types of headaches run in families (due to genetics), and headaches can occur during different stages of life. Some have a consistent pattern, while others do not. To make this even more complicated, it’s not uncommon to have more than one type of headache at the same time!

Headaches can vary in frequency and intensity, as some people can have several headaches in one day that come and go, while others have multiple headaches per month or maybe only one or two a year. Headaches may be continuous and last for days or weeks and may or may not fluctuate in intensity.

For some, lying down in a dark, quiet room is a must. For others, life can continue on like normal. Headaches are a major reason for missed work or school days as well as for doctor visits. The “cost” of headaches is enormous—running into the billions of dollars per year in the United States (US) in both direct costs and productivity losses. Indirect costs such as the potential future costs in children with headaches who miss school and the associated interference with their academic progress are much more difficult to calculate.

There are MANY types of headaches, which are classified into types. With each type, there is a different cause or group of causes. For example, migraine headaches, which affect about 12% of the US population (both children and adults), are vascular in nature—where the blood vessels dilate or enlarge and irritate nerve-sensitive tissues inside the head. This usually results in throbbing, pulsating pain often on one side of the head and can include nausea and/or vomiting. Some migraine sufferers have an “aura” such as a flashing or bright light that occurs within 10-15 minutes prior to the onset while other migraine sufferers do not have an aura.

The tension-type headache is the most common type and as the name implies, is triggered by stress or some type of tension. The intensity ranges between mild and severe, usually on both sides of the head and often begin during adolescence and peak around age 30, affecting women slightly more than men. These can be episodic (come and go, ten to fifteen times a month, lasting 30 min. to several days) or chronic (more than fifteen times a month over a three-month period).

There are many other types of headaches that may be primary or secondary—when caused by an underlying illness or condition. The GOOD news is chiropractic care is often extremely helpful in managing headaches of all varieties and should be included in the healthcare team when management requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach.

We realize you have a choice in whom you consider for your health care provision and we sincerely appreciate your trust in choosing our service for those needs.  If you, a friend, or family member requires care for neck pain or headaches, we would be honored to render our services.

YOU MAY BE A CANDIDATE FOR CHIROPRACTIC CARE FOR HEADACHES! FOR A FREE NO-OBLIGATION CONSULTATION CALL 717-697-1888