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Does Slouching Cause Neck and Shoulder Pain?

22 Mar

In a 2015 study, Swedish researchers compared the effect of a slouched vs. normal body posture with regards to performing lifting tasks.

In particular, investigators wanted a better understanding of how a slouched posture affects neck and shoulder function and muscle activity in three large muscle groups—the upper trapezius (UT), lower trapezius (LT), and serratus anterior (SA)—during arm elevation to see if it affects range of motion, muscle activation patterns, maximal muscle activity, and total muscle work.

Study participants—non-injured, young adult males—perform maximum arm elevations in upright and slouched postures that researchers observed using a combined 3D movement and EMG (electromyography) assessment system. This measured the arm range of motion, velocity, and spine curvature simultaneously with EMG activity in the UT, LT, and SA muscles.

The research team found that participants in the slouched position experienced significantly less arm elevation and decreased movement velocity both upwards and downwards, in addition to increased peak muscle activity (that is, the muscles had to work harder) in all three muscles tested.

It appears that increased thoracic kyphosis (slouching) leads to a marked increase in physical requirements when performing simple arm movements. Over time, such changes in function could place added stress on the muscles, tissues, and joints of the neck and shoulder, leading to pain and injury. These findings add to a growing body of research regarding the detrimental long-term effects of poor posture as well as an understanding of how exactly faulty postures increase the risk of musculoskeletal disorders.

In their conclusion, the authors of the study write, “[Patients] suffering from neck-shoulder pain and disability should be investigated and treated for defective thoracic curvature issues.”

 

This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all healthcare concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a healthcare professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.
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Migraine Headaches and Nutrition?

18 Jan

According to a World Health Report, migraines are the nineteenth most common patient complaint worldwide with an 18% of women and 6% of men in the United States experiencing at least one migraine headache episode each year.

There is evidence that patients with migraines have an energy deficit disorder associated with their glucose intake. As such, adopting a strict ketogenic diet (in which ketones are the primary source of energy for the body in place of glucose) does appear to benefit patients with migraines.

A 2017 study set out to determine if it was the absence of glucose or the increase in ketone bodies that made the difference for patients. In the study, researchers provided four female migraine patients with a specially designed ten-gram beverage containing a specific type of ketone  called B-hydroxybutyrate or bHB twice a day for four weeks.

After one month, their migraine frequency rate dropped 50% to eight days/month on average without any serious side effects.  The patients also lost weight, presumably due to consuming less glucose in their diet. An additional benefit of higher levels of ketones in the body is that they have an anti-inflammatory effect.

A larger double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial is now underway with a group of 90 patients that will last three months The goal of the study is to determine if this nutritional supplement is capable of reducing migraine headaches without the significant side effects and associated disabilities that are currently associated with many migraine medications.

Chiropractic care often includes nutritional counseling as an important part of caring for the whole person. In fact, there is research supported evidence that spinal manipulation alone has a very positive benefit for migraine headache patients as noted in the 2010 and 2014 UK studies regarding the effectiveness of manual therapies. Based on the outcome of this large-scale study, the use of ketone-based supplementation for migraines may become a new standard.

What Is Torticollis?

18 Dec

Torticollis, also called wry neck or loxia, represents a category of neck conditions which exhibit a twisting position of the head and neck outside of a normal neutral position. There are many potential causes for torticollis from sleeping in a faulty position to an injury to the neck, like whiplash. However, it’s commonly labeled as “idiopathic,” which basically means, “We don’t know what caused it.”

Torticollis often occurs out of the blue with no obvious cause or history such as, “When I woke up, I couldn’t turn or move my head!” It can occur at any age and may disappear on its own in a few days to weeks, but in rare cases, it can persist for months or years.

Because it can be quite alarming, most people quickly seek healthcare services, which can include visiting a doctor of chiropractic. Once the more serious causes of torticollis are ruled out (such as a severe type of infection like a retropharyngeal abscess or bacterial meningitis, fracture, neoplasm, cervical dystonia, etc.), conservative care can proceed.

If a patient has a family history of torticollis, they may have a more serious form of torticollis called cervical dystonia. This usually begins between 31-50 years of age and if left untreated, it can become permanent.

Chiropractic care often includes stretching in which manual cervical traction, spinal mobilization, and myofascial release techniques help to restore the lost range of motion and faulty posture. Once enough motion has been restored, your doctor of chiropractic may utilize spinal manipulation, which often hastens the recovery rate of torticollis. Your chiropractor may also use physical therapy modalities and or provide instruction on home-based exercises and other self-management strategies.

This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all healthcare concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a healthcare professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.

Chiropractic Care for Patients with Headaches

16 Oct

Though there are many different types of headaches, many involve both the upper cervical region (the neck) and the head. Between the muscles that attach to the head and neck, the ligaments that hold the vertebrae together, the blood vessels that allow blood to flow to and from the head, and the nerves that allow us to smell, taste, see, smile, wink, stick out our tongue, and so much more, it’s no wonder that the neck is intimately related to the head and therefore headaches.

One structure that sheds additional light on this close relationship between the neck and headaches is called the “myodural bridge” (MDB), which spans between a muscle in the back of the neck called the rectus capitus posterior minor and the protective covering of the spinal cord called the dura mater. This connection sits in close proximity to the vertebral artery, veins, and the first cervical nerve or C1 (the occipital nerve).

So how does this MDB cause headaches? Normally when we move our head and neck, the muscle contraction puts tension on the MDB, transmitting its force to tense up the dura, stabilizing the spinal cord. This prevents infolding of the dura, which can generate pain in the form of a headache.

When an injury such as whiplash occurs, cervical vertebral joint dysfunction and overly tight muscles in this area transmit abnormal tension to the dura mater via the MDB, which (like infolding) can result in headaches. If the injured muscle/s weaken or atrophy, this can further compromise the function of the MDB, leading to chronic (long-term) headaches.

A common symptom of an MDB headache is a throbbing pain, usually on one side of head near the ear/temple area and possibly behind the eye. The headache may last from several minutes to several days and the base of the head is tender to the touch. Typically, head movements intensify the pain/headache and neck pain may or may not be present.

Research shows that chiropractic manipulation, soft tissue therapy, and exercise can significantly benefit patients with headaches, regardless of the cause. But it is easy to understand that treatment directed to this region is necessary to restore function, and discovery of this MDB may play an important role as to why chiropractic care is so effective for headache patients.

This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all healthcare concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a healthcare professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.

Chiropractic Care and Migraine Headaches

17 Aug

Migraines affect approximately 15% of the general population and are usually managed by medication. However, this traditional treatment approach is not well tolerated by some migraine sufferers due to side effects. Additionally, some people prefer to avoid the risks associated with taking some medications over the long term.

A systematic literature review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving the use of manual therapies to treat migraines found that chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) is equally as effective as the medications propranolol and topiramate in the management of such headaches.

One case report featured the successful outcome of a 24-year-old pregnant female who had a history of migraine headaches starting at age twelve. She had previously tried other forms of care including osteopathy, physical therapy, massage therapy, and medication including a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory with codeine. Due to her pregnancy, she turned to chiropractic care in hopes of achieving relief without the use of medications. The application of spinal manipulative therapy along with other manual therapies led to a satisfying outcome which allowed her to cease using her medication.

Another case study featured a 72-year-old woman with a 60-year history of migraine headaches that included nausea, vomiting, photophobia (light sensitivity), and phonophobia (noise sensitivity). Prior to treatment, the patient averaged one to two migraines per week, which lasted one to three days in duration. Following a course of chiropractic care, her headaches resolved completely, which eliminated the need for any migraine medication. A follow-up seven years later confirmed her continued migraine-free status.

In a case involving a 49-year-old female patient suffering from migraine headaches following a car accident, a twelve-week course of chiropractic care utilizing SMT along with both active and other passive therapies led to significant improvements in the patient’s migraine-related disability and pain.

In another case, a 17-year-old boy fell on his head while pole vaulting and began to experience bipolar disorder symptoms, seizures, sleeping problems, and migraine headaches. After failing to respond to various treatment approaches from numerous physicians, he sought treatment from a doctor of chiropractic at age 23. After four months of chiropractic care, his migraine frequency dropped from three times a week to twice a month. He reported a full recovery after seven months of care, which was sustained at an 18-month follow-up.

FOR A FREE NO-OBLIGATION CONSULTATION CALL 717-697-1888

Dr. Brent Binder
4909 Louise Drive, Suite 102
Mechanicsburg Pa, 17055

Member of Chiro-Trust.org

Chiropractic Care and Headaches

17 Jul

The cervical spine is often implicated in the onset and/or presence of headaches. This is due in part to the first three cervical nerve roots exiting out of the spine and enter the back of the head through a particularly thick group of muscles attached to the base of the skull along the nuchal ridge.

Anything that tightens up the upper cervical musculature can give rise to headache, and certainly stress has the unique characteristic of increasing neck muscle tension. Cervicogenic headache and tension-type headache are the two most commonly used terms associated with neck dysfunction.  Migraine headaches are a vascular type of headache, and these too can be greatly helped by spinal manipulation of the upper cervical region, though the mechanism of how this helps is less understood.

When patients see a chiropractor to treat their headaches, the paperwork they complete may include questionnaires regarding how their headaches impact both their wellbeing and their day-to-day activities. This data can be used to monitor a patient’s progress over time. Similarly, patients may be asked for data at each visit regarding the frequency, intensity, and duration of their headaches since their last visit in order to determine if a new approach to treatment should be considered.

Chiropractic offers multiple types of treatments with the goal of reducing neck and headache pain, restoring function to the vertebrae in the cervical spine—especially in the upper cervical region—and teaching the patient preventative methods of self-management such as exercises, ice and/or heat, and dietary modifications.

Because chiropractic includes an evaluation of the entire musculoskeletal system, a doctor of chiropractic may spot biomechanical faults lower in the body that may play a role in the headache process. A good example of this is a flat foot with ankle pronation, which creates a knocked-kneed effect and a drop in the pelvis on the same side. This can affect the curvature of the spine, causing stability issues up into the neck. In this case, prescriptive foot orthotics to correct the ankle pronation problem and/or a heel lift to correct a short leg can have dramatic benefits for headache sufferers, not to mention other spinal complaints such as low back pain.

FOR A FREE NO-OBLIGATION CONSULTATION CALL 717-697-1888

Dr. Brent Binder
4909 Louise Drive, Suite 102
Mechanicsburg Pa, 17055

Member of Chiro-Trust.org

This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all healthcare concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a healthcare professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.