20 Fun and Amazing Health Facts.

1 Jan

1.) Women have a better sense of smell than men. 2.) When you take a step, you use up to 200 muscles. 3.) Your ears secrete more earwax when you are afraid than when you aren’t. 4.) The human brain has the capacity to store everything you experience. 5.) It takes twice as long to lose new muscle if you stop working out than it did to gain it. 6.) The average person’s skin weighs twice as much as their brain. 7.) Every year your body replaces 98% of your atoms. 8.) On average, there are 100 billion neurons in the human brain. 9.) The lifespan of a taste bud is ten days.  10.) Dentists recommend you keep your toothbrush at least 6 feet away from a toilet to avoid airborne particles caused by flushing.  11.) Your tongue is the only muscle in your body that is attached at only one end. 12.) Your stomach produces a new layer of mucus every two weeks so that it doesn’t digest itself. 13.) It takes about 20 seconds for a red blood cell to circle the whole body. 14.) The pupil of the eye expands as much as 45% when a person looks at something pleasing. 15.) Your heart rate can rise as much as 30% during a yawn. 16.) Your heart pumps about 2,000 gallons of blood each day. 17.) Your heart beats over 100,000 times a day. 18.) Your hair grows faster in the morning than at any other time of day.  19.) Your body is creating and killing 15 million red blood cells per second. 20.) You’re born with 300 bones, but when you reach adulthood, you only have 206!

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Neck Posture BEFORE a Car Wreck – Is It Important?

22 Mar

Abnormal postures of the neck—straight and reversed (kyphotic) curves, for example—are commonly encountered after an individual has experienced a motor vehicle collision (MVC). Many studies discuss the mechanism of injury during a rear-impact MVC that result in a straight or kyphotic curve, but few have considered the importance of this abnormal posture being present BEFORE the MVC and the role that plays regarding the degree of the resulting injury.

A group of researchers looked at this very issue and compared what happens to the cervical spine that is “normal” (lordotic) vs. straight vs. reversed (kyphotic) in a classic rear-end MVC. When the neck flexes or bends forward, the facet joints in the cervical vertebrae open up and the facet capsules and associated ligaments stretch or elongate. To determine what degree of injury would arise among the three postures, researchers measured the amount of stretch/elongation in these ligaments using a validated mathematical model of the human head-neck complex. With a normal lordotic posture, the greatest load during the simulated rear-end collision occurred high in the neck at C2-3, in the back part of the cervical spine, and from C3-4 to C6-7, on the sides of the cervical spine.

Most importantly, as the normal lordotic curve reduced to a straight and then further into a kyphotic or reversed curve, the researchers observed increases in the elongation magnitudes in the facet joints by up to 70%! Excessive elongation of the ligaments and join capsules can result in tearing and subsequent laxity to the facet joints as well as the surrounding ligamentous supporting tissues.

Laxity in these supporting tissues can lead to excessive movement between each vertebra and predispose them to accelerated degenerative changes leading to spinal instability over time. This study provides quantitative kinematic data that is level- and region-specific and supports the clinical findings that abnormal spinal curvatures increase the likelihood of whiplash injury severity.

Chiropractic focuses on the “3-P’s” – Pain management, Posture correction, and Prevention through the use of manual therapies, posture correction techniques, exercise training specific to each individual, and lifestyle management through diet and stress management strategies. The importance of restoring abnormal posture of the cervical spine is well illustrated by this study. Discuss this with your doctor of chiropractic to minimize your risk of injury in the event of a future trauma!

This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all healthcare concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a healthcare professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.

Can the Cervical Spine Cause Shoulder Pain?

18 Mar

Subacromial impingement (SAI) is a common injury in sporting activities that require overhead motions, especially among pitchers, quarterbacks, and swimmers. Not everyone responds to treatment to the same degree, and a new study that reviewed two specific cases may offer a possible reason: the neck.

One of the two cases involved a high school football quarterback and the other a collegiate swimmer. Both participants presented with signs and symptoms of subacromial impingement with minimal neck complaints and few clinical signs that initially supported neck involvement.

Of interest, both patients had poor posture that included forward head carriage and rounded forward shoulders. During the initial examination, both had shoulder pain and weakness while raising their arm up from the side, a “classic” sign of rotator cuff muscle injury and subacromial bursitis. However, neither case did well when treatment addressed only the shoulder, prompting their doctors to test whether or not the patients’ poor posture had a role in their shoulder discomfort.

Once the patients performed chin retraction exercises followed by chin retraction plus extension exercises (three sets of ten repetitions) to improve their posture, they experienced a complete improvement in shoulder impingement and muscle weakness.

The author suspects that both patients experienced intermittent irritation of the C5 nerve root in the neck, which innervates the rotator cuff muscles, leading to their shoulder pain and weakness. In both cases, the two athletes performed home-based exercises and returned to their sports and did not have further problems during the rest of the season.

These two cases are GREAT examples of why doctors of chiropractic evaluate the whole patient to identify any and all factors that may contribute to a patient’s chief complaint. It is very common to find cervical spine joint dysfunction in patients with shoulder pain, and success in treatment favors treating both areas, of which (as noted in these case studies) the neck may be the most important focus.

What is Hip Impingement? Can Chiropractic Help?

14 Mar

Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a pathological hip condition found in 17% of the population, and it’s caused by abnormal contact between the ball of hip and the socket. To be more precise, it’s the head-neck junction that impinges against the rim of the acetabulum. There are three types of FAI: cam, pincer, or a combination of the two. The cam deformity (also called “pistol-grip”) is from too much bone at the head-neck junction and is found in 65-75% of FAIs (often active young men 20-30 years old). The pincer deformity is from too much bone off the front of the acetabular rim (like a spur), and it is often seen in middle aged, active women. Less than 10% have both cam and pincer deformities together.

In some cases, FAI can arise without either a cam or pincer deformity and occurs as a consequence of extreme hip movements like those associated with ballet, gymnastics, or weight lifting (squatting). There are actually several types of impingement syndromes in the spine-pelvic region, but we will focus on that which occurs at the hip joint specifically, the FAI syndrome.

The pain associated with FAI results from repeated abutment, or contact, between the two bones leading to injury of the adjacent cartilage and/or labrum, which is a crescent-shaped band of cartilage that stabilizes, lubricates, and cushions the hip joint. Over time, repeated trauma can lead to hip joint osteoarthritis (OA). In fact, in a large population study, researchers observed cam and/or pincer deformities in 71% of males and 37% of females with hip OA.

The clinical presentation of FAI is usually found in healthy, active adults between 20-50 years in age. In older patients, it’s frequently accompanied by hip OA. Anterior FAI presents with pain in the front of the hip, groin, pubic bone, and/or anterior thigh and often arises from activities that include running/sprinting, kicking sports, hill climbing, and prolonged/repeated sitting in low chairs – any activity where the hip flexes forward (knee-to-chest positions).

Impingement from pincer deformities can also give rise to posterior FAI, or pain in the back of the hip joint. When this occurs, pain in the buttock and sacroiliac joint (SIJ) have to be differentiated from pain arising from the low back and/or SIJ. Repeated hip hyperextension such as from fast walking and hiking downhill are common causes.

So, can chiropractic help? Short answer – YES! The current research shows that non-surgical care for FAI should include avoiding activities that impinge the hip (discontinuing or modifying a sport or daily activity), reducing inflammation, and exercising to stretch the hip flexors and strengthen hip extensors. Once a proper diagnosis is made, your doctor of chiropractic can advise you on the best ways to manage your FAI.

 

This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all healthcare concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a healthcare professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.

How Does Chiropractic Help Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

11 Mar

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) occurs when pressure is placed on the median nerve as it passes through bones and ligaments of the wrist in order to innervate a portion of the hand. This pressure can be cause by compression of the carpal tunnel due to mechanical injury or when other tissues near the median nerve become inflamed, either from disease or overuse.

When it comes to treating a patient with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), what separates chiropractic care from standard medical care? Both options recommend night wrist splints, anti-inflammatory measures, rest, and the “tincture of time.” Doctors of chiropractic are trained to provide manual therapies like manipulation and mobilization. Two studies show that these therapies can relieve pressure on the median nerve by improving the shape of the carpal tunnel itself.

In a study published in December 2018 in The Journal of Hand Surgery, researchers used dynamic ultrasound to capture images of longitudinal median nerve motion inside the tunnel as compressive forces were applied to the two sides of the wrist and distal forearm in both healthy and CTS patients. The researchers observed that the median nerve moved more within the carpal tunnel in patients with CTS compared to those without the condition.

In an anatomical study published in the journal Clinical Biomechanics (November 2018), lead author Dr. Elena Bueno-Gracia and colleagues measured the cross-sectional area of the carpal tunnel before and after manual manipulation and mobilization of the carpal bones. They observed both an increase in the front-to-back diameter of the tunnel AND a reduction in pressure on the median nerve. Additionally, the researchers noted that the shape of the carpal tunnel itself becomes more round following manipulative therapy. The research team reported that their findings are consistent with prior studies.

These studies demonstrate that the carpal tunnel is indeed dynamic/flexible and that manual techniques can alter its shape, providing more “breathing room” and allowing the contents within (i.e., the tendons and the median nerve) increased mobility with less friction.

Doctors of chiropractic are trained to provide manual therapies, which include mobilization and manipulation, of the spine and extremities of individuals with musculoskeletal conditions, including carpal tunnel syndrome.  Together with the “standard” therapies previously mentioned, proper exercises, and patient education, chiropractic is the perfect choice for non-surgical CTS care!

 

This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all healthcare concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a healthcare professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.

Can Chiropractic Help Dysmenorrhea?

7 Mar

Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is a very common gynecological disorder affecting 84.1% of women during childbearing age. The most common symptoms of PD include lower abdominal pain that can radiate to both thighs and/or to the low back. Other symptoms include tiredness, headache, nausea, constipation, and diarrhea. The condition precedes menstruation (in the absence of any organic pathology) and lasts approximately 48-72 hours. Primary dysmenorrhea is the most common reason for absenteeism from work or school, thus interfering with quality of daily life, which is associated with many direct and indirect costs.

There have been MANY proposed interventions for PD reported in the scientific literature. Most common are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and oral contraceptives, as both work similarly—they affect the cause of pelvic pain, which is reportedly mediated by the hormone-like fatty acid called prostaglandin factor 2x. However, both approaches carry negative side effects such as bleeding in the gut and hormone issues such as bloating and edema, respectively. Thus, the demand for new and alternative approaches with less associated risks has increased.

Spinal manipulative (SM) techniques for PD has been previously studied and proven to have positive benefits on pain perception and menstrual cramps, as well as affecting plasma (blood) levels of some chemical pain mediators. However, there appears to be a lack of agreement on where spinal manipulation should be applied. One study recommended that SM should be applied to the lumbosacral region (L5-S1) for symptom reduction in dysmenorrhea.

A more recent study found that “global pelvic manipulation” (GPM) performed on both sides of the pelvis to mobilize the sacroiliac joint (SIJ) and L5-S1 facet joint resulted in improvements related to low back pain and pressure pain thresholds in the SIJ, with a significant increase in serotonin.

Doctors of chiropractic specialize in the use of spinal manipulation therapy and are trained in many different techniques of lumbo-pelvic manipulation. For those struggling with PD, including a chiropractor as a member in your healthcare “team” makes perfect sense!

 

This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all healthcare concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a healthcare professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.

Adding This To Your Diet May Help Your Memory…

25 Feb

Curcumin, a chemical found in turmeric that gives mustard and curry their yellow color, has long been known for its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant capabilities. Because of its prevalence in Indian cuisine, some researchers suspect that reduced inflammation in the brain from frequent curcumin use may explain why senior citizens in India have a lower prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease and better cognitive performance than older adults from other backgrounds.

In a 2018 study published in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, UCLA researchers examined what effects an easily absorbed curcumin supplement had on memory in individuals with AND without Alzheimer’s disease. The study utilized a double-blind, placebo-controlled study that included 40 adults (age 50-90) who had mild memory complaints. The patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups receiving either a placebo or 90 mg of curcumin two times a day for 18 months. Outcome measures used in the study included standard cognitive tests performed initially and again at six-month intervals, and curcumin blood levels were measured initially and again after 18 months. Positron emission tomography (PET) scans were utilized in 30 of the 40 subjects to determine the levels of amyloid and tau in the brain tissue at the start and after 18 months.

The curcumin group experienced significant improvements in memory and attention skills while members of the placebo group did not. Participants in the curcumin group also performed 28% better on memory assessments and reported mild improvements in their mood. Moreover, their brain PET scans showed significantly less amyloid and tau signals in the amygdala and hypothalamus, parts of the brain associated with memory and emotional functions.

The only reported side effects were mild abdominal pain and nausea, which affected four of the curcumin group participants. The authors are planning a larger study that will include people with mild depression to see if curcumin can also serve as an anti-depressant. It will also allow researchers to assess whether curcumin’s memory enhancing effects will vary according to people’s genetic risk for acquiring Alzheimer’s, their age, or the extent of their cognitive problems.

These preliminary results are exciting, as it appears that taking curcumin could provide meaningful cognitive benefits over the years. Doctors of chiropractic frequently council patients on diet and supplementation through the use vitamin, minerals, herbal formulas, and more, of which turmeric/curcumin is a common recommendation, especially given it anti-inflammatory benefits for musculoskeletal conditions.

 

This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all healthcare concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a healthcare professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.