20 Fun and Amazing Health Facts.

1 Jan

1.) Women have a better sense of smell than men. 2.) When you take a step, you use up to 200 muscles. 3.) Your ears secrete more earwax when you are afraid than when you aren’t. 4.) The human brain has the capacity to store everything you experience. 5.) It takes twice as long to lose new muscle if you stop working out than it did to gain it. 6.) The average person’s skin weighs twice as much as their brain. 7.) Every year your body replaces 98% of your atoms. 8.) On average, there are 100 billion neurons in the human brain. 9.) The lifespan of a taste bud is ten days.  10.) Dentists recommend you keep your toothbrush at least 6 feet away from a toilet to avoid airborne particles caused by flushing.  11.) Your tongue is the only muscle in your body that is attached at only one end. 12.) Your stomach produces a new layer of mucus every two weeks so that it doesn’t digest itself. 13.) It takes about 20 seconds for a red blood cell to circle the whole body. 14.) The pupil of the eye expands as much as 45% when a person looks at something pleasing. 15.) Your heart rate can rise as much as 30% during a yawn. 16.) Your heart pumps about 2,000 gallons of blood each day. 17.) Your heart beats over 100,000 times a day. 18.) Your hair grows faster in the morning than at any other time of day.  19.) Your body is creating and killing 15 million red blood cells per second. 20.) You’re born with 300 bones, but when you reach adulthood, you only have 206!

Advertisements

Migraine Headaches and Nutrition Approaches

15 Jul

People with migraines know all too well about that throbbing, pulsating, and nauseated feeling that accompanies their headaches and the associated disability that often results. The underlying cause of migraine headaches is still not well understood, but genetics (family history), chemical imbalances in the brain (serotonin, in particular), environmental factors (weather, allergens), and hormonal changes appear to play a part. Because medications to manage headaches can come with potentially serious side effects, especially with prolonged use, many patients opt for non-pharmaceutical treatment approaches to reduce the frequency and intensity of their migraines…

A 2018 survey of 4,356 American adults with a history of migraines found that common symptoms associated with migraines include sensitivity to touch (32%), food cravings (28%), and hallucinations (18%), which include sound and smell. The most common foods to trigger a migraine were chocolate at 75%, cheese (especially aged cheeses) at 48%, citrus fruit at 30%, and alcohol (especially red wine) at 25%. Other foods that may be triggers include cured meats, monosodium glutamate (MSG), aspartame (and other artificial sweeteners), snack foods, fatty foods, dairy products, food dyes, coffee, tea, cola, and nuts.

According to a 2019 study, people who suffer from migraines are often deficient in magnesium (Mg), a mineral naturally found in spinach, nuts, and whole grains. Magnesium is also important in regulating blood pressure, blood sugar (glucose), and muscle and nerve function. A meta-review of previous study findings revealed that migraine patients who received a Mg supplement reported reductions in both headache frequency and intensity. Other benefits included a decrease in hospitalization during pregnancy, and at a higher dose, a lower incidence of type-2 diabetes and stroke!

Another nutritional anti-migraine option includes the use of fever few (Tanacetum parthenium) for both prevention and treatment of migraine headaches. Other benefits of fever few include fever reduction, irregular menstrual cycles, arthritis, psoriasis, allergies, asthma, tinnitus, dizziness, and nausea/vomiting. There is also research support for the use of riboflavin (vitamin B-2), melatonin and coenzyme Q10 by migraine patients.

Doctors of chiropractic often manage their migraine headache patients using a multi-modal approach that includes cervical spinal manipulation and mobilization, physical therapy modalities, home exercise training, nutritional counselling (including supplementation advice), and other conservative treatment approaches based on the patient’s specific needs.

 

This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all healthcare concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a healthcare professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.

Knee Pain and Foot Problems

11 Jul

Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is commonly associated with running, jumping, squatting, and walking up/down stairs. It’s thought that PFP is caused by excessive rubbing between the back of the patella and groove, or track, that it rides in. Besides overuse, additional causes for PFP pain include muscle imbalance or weakness or direct trauma. The condition is most common in adolescents and young adults, usually due to overuse and/or misalignment, the latter of which is often referred to as poor “patellofemoral tracking.” This can eventually lead to arthritis, which is more commonly seen in older adults with PF pain.

Past research has demonstrated that issues in the foot can increase the risk for musculoskeletal pain in other parts of the body, including the knees. In a 2018 study, researchers examined the effect of knee-targeted exercise vs. a combined approach that included knee- and foot-focused exercise with foot orthotics (shoe inserts to correct pronation or the rolling inwards of the ankle and foot) in patients with patellofemoral pain.

Participants were instructed to perform terminal extension quad exercises that emphasized COMPLETE extension (straightening) of the knee. This exercise can be done sitting or lying on the back with a rolled-up towel behind the knees (with or without an ankle weight) and fully flexing the quad muscles for three to five seconds and repeating the process ten to twenty times, as tolerated.

The results revealed a significantly greater improvement in the group that included foot care, supporting the conclusion that better outcomes are achieved by combining foot exercise and foot orthotics with knee exercises. The authors reported that the benefits were still present four months after the conclusion of care but not a year, suggesting the importance of continuing exercise and foot orthotic use.

Doctors of chiropractic routinely perform posture assessments when examining patients with knee pain in order to identify dysfunction in the hip or feet that may contribute to their chief complaint.

 

This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all healthcare concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a healthcare professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.

Two GREAT Treatment Options for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

8 Jul

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has long been recognized as an occupational disease, and though the incidence of many other occupational diseases has decreased over time, CTS appears to be becoming more prevalent.

A 2019 study looked at the impact/benefit of wrist-specific exercises and oral enzyme therapy on automotive assembly line workers with CTS (excluding those treated previously or who had a positive history of hormone replacement or current pregnancy, inflammatory joint disease, trauma to the affected hand, polyneuropathy, other relevant conditions).

Participants in the exercise group performed the following exercises at home for nine weeks:

  • Deep “push & pull”: Massage the palm-side of the wrist using the thumb from the opposite hand for 30 seconds.
  • “Prayer Position”: Place the palms together in front of your chest; press the fingers slowly against each other for five seconds and release for five seconds; press the palms together and then slowly lower the hands toward the floor. Repeat as tolerated, gradually increasing reps.
  • Neuromobilization: Stand sideways to a wall; place the palm of the left hand on the wall, fingers pointing back to a “10 o’clock” position. Start with the elbow bent and slowly straighten it while bending the head sideways toward the wall (left). Slowly bend the elbow and bend the neck/head to the right. Repeat six to eight times with each hand.

The enzyme group took oral enzymes (which are known for their anti-inflammatory, anti-edematous, and analgesic effects) that included 2,000 mg pancreatin, 900 mg bromelain, 1,200 mg papain, 480 mg trypsin, 20 mg chymotrypsin, 200 mg amylase, 200 mg lipase, and 1,000 mg of rutin for nine weeks divided into two doses a day.

Compared with a third group that continued their usual activities, participants in both the enzyme and exercise groups reported improvements with their CTS symptoms. Nerve conduction velocity tests also revealed improved function in the median nerve.

Doctors of chiropractic commonly utilize a multi-modal approach when treating CTS, which often include manual therapies, nutritional recommendations, exercises, activity/modifications, and overnight wrist splinting.

This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all healthcare concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a healthcare professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.

Walking Backward for Chronic Low Back Pain

1 Jul

Kinesiophobia, the fear of movement, is a common occurrence for patients with chronic low back pain (cLBP). Unfortunately, self-restricting one’s daily physical activity can result in muscle weakness and atrophy. This can lead to further inactivity and more muscle weakness, and subsequently, poor tolerance of normal activities of daily living, work absenteeism, and depression. When the muscles around the low back or lumbar spine become atrophied and weak, the risk for acute flair-ups of low back pain (LBP) increases, leading to more dysfunction and distress.

Studies have reported that when comparing the muscles in the front of the lumbar spine (the “flexors”) to those behind the spine (the “extensors”) in individuals with cLBP, greater amounts of atrophy and weakness occur to the extensors. The lumbar multifidus (MF) muscles are crucial for maintaining stability of the lumbar spine, while the erector spinae (ES) superficial extensor muscles are known as “global stabilizers”, which are designed to produce gross movements and to counterbalance when lifting external loads.

When treating patients with cLBP, doctors of chiropractic commonly prescribe rehabilitation/exercise programs to improve motor control, muscle strengthening, stretching, and aerobic capacity. One such exercise that may be recommended is walking backward. Compared with walking forward, studies have shown that walking backward can lead to better results with respect to cardiovascular fitness and MF muscle activation (which as noted previously, are often weaker in cLBP patients).

Additionally, walking backward works the lower limb muscles to a greater degree while reducing stress on the patellofemoral joint (the kneecap). This is important, as knee pain can commonly co-occur with low back pain, especially in patients who are overweight/obese. Walking backward also stretches the hamstrings, which are often short/tight in cLBP patients.

So not only can walking backward benefit patients who already have back pain, but adding this activity to your exercise regimen may also reduce the risk for low back pain in the first place!

This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all healthcare concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a healthcare professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.

The 25-Second Balance Challenge

24 Jun

Since falls are a major cause of serious injury, especially for older adults, here’s a simple way to objectively measure and improve your sense of balance…

First, stand in a place where you can catch yourself from falling (like behind a chair or in a corner). Place your feet side by side for ten seconds. Then, place the heel of one foot next to your big toe for ten seconds. Finally, rest the forefoot fully in front of the other (like standing on a tight rope) and wait ten seconds. If this process presents no issues, you can proceed.

Stand on one foot/leg for up to 30 seconds with your eyes open. Next, switch legs and repeat the process. Switch back to the first leg, get your balance, and start a 25 second timer. Close your eyes and see if you can maintain your balance for the full 25 seconds. If you must open your eyes and put your foot down, keep track of your time and try the exercise up to three times in a row to see if you can improve. Repeat this on the opposite leg.

The 25-second “cut-off” for “eyes closed” is published as the “norm” for those up to 59 years old. If you are 60-69 years old, the norm drops to ten seconds and if you are 70-79, the norm is only four seconds! This means we NORMALLY lose our sense of balance with age, but that doesn’t mean you should accept it, as retraining your balance system is feasible with the proper exercises.

First, practice the test described above, as it is also a great exercise for improving balance. Other balance challenges can include the use of a balance or rocker board, walking like you’re on a tight rope, walking backward, hopping in place, and stepping up and down on one or two steps. The important thing is to work these exercises into your daily routine. Many of these balance challenges also work well as a great “mini-break”, especially if you have a desk job.

Re-test your balance skills once one or two weeks and see if you can improve your time. You will be surprised how quickly and how much you can improve your balance skills and how much steadier it can make you feel in your everyday activities. Fall prevention starts with knowing your current abilities, and re-testing keeps you motivated!

 

This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all healthcare concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a healthcare professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.

Multi-Modal Care for Whiplash Patients

20 Jun

The term whiplash associated disorders (WAD) describes a constellation of symptoms that includes (partial list) pain, stiffness/limited motion, dizziness, headache, depression/anxiety, and brain-fog. The condition is associated with accelerations/deceleration events like car accidents, sports collisions, or slip and falls. Such injuries are classified into four categories: WAD I (no/minimal complaints/injury), WAD II (soft-tissue injury – muscle/tendon and/or ligament injury), WAD III (nerve injury), WAD IV (fracture). More than 85% of those involved in a motor vehicle collision (MVC) experience neck pain, with 29-40% recovering within a little more than three months and about 23% still not having recovered after one year.

A 2016 systematic review generated treatment guidelines for patients with WAD and/or neck associated disorders (NAD) in the context of both a recent injury and for cases in which pain has persisted for longer than three months. Importantly, these guidelines were formed with input from several types of healthcare providers, including doctors of chiropractic, medical doctors, and physical therapists.

For recent-onset neck pain (0-3 months), the authors recommend multimodal care (multiple types); manipulation or mobilization; range-of-motion home exercise or multimodal manual therapy (for grades I-II NAD); adding supervised graded strengthening exercise (grade III NAD); and multimodal care (grade III WAD).

For persistent neck pain (more than 3 months), the review recommends multimodal care or stress self-management; manipulation with soft tissue therapy; high-dose massage; supervised group exercise; supervised yoga; supervised strengthening exercises or home exercises (grades I-II NAD); multimodal care or practitioner’s advice (grades I-III NAD); and supervised exercise with advice or advice alone (grades I-II WAD). For patients with persistent neck and shoulder pain, evidence supports mixed supervised and unsupervised high-intensity strength training or advice alone (grades I-III NAD).

The term, “multi-modal care” is defined as a grouping of manipulation, mobilization, and soft tissue techniques (myofascial release, contract-hold, trigger point therapy, muscle energy, and more). Multi-modal care may also incorporate the use of hot or cold packs, assisted stretching, advice to stay active or modify activity, and neck/shoulder exercise training. Doctors of chiropractic often take a multi-modal approach when treating patients with musculoskeletal pain, including those with whiplash associated disorders.

 

This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all healthcare concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a healthcare professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.