New Study Shows Refined Sugars May Raise Blood Pressure More Than Salt!

3 Feb

There is no question,  science has dramatically changed the way in which we see the world and has helped us better understand both ourselves and the universe we inhabit.

Here is something most people do not know about science and the scientific method: it raises more questions than answers. You see, the purpose of science is NOT to “prove” things.  In fact, all scientific theories are actually unprovable.

The late philosopher Karl Popper believed a hypothesis, proposition, or theory is “scientific” only if it is, among other things, falsifiable.

According to Princeton University’s website:

“Falsifiability or refutability is the logical possibility that an assertion could be shown false by a particular observation or physical experiment.  That something is ‘falsifiable’ does not mean it is false; rather, it means that if the statement were false, then its falsehood could be demonstrated. The claim ‘No human lives forever’ is not falsifiable since it does not seem possible to prove wrong.  In theory, one would have to observe a human living forever to falsify that claim. 

On the other hand, ‘All humans live forever’ is falsifiable since the presentation of just one dead human could prove the statement wrong (excluding metaphysical assertions about souls, which are not falsifiable). Moreover, a claim may be true and still be falsifiable; if ‘All humans live forever’ were true, we would never actually find a dead human, and yet that claim would still be falsifiable because we can at least imagine the observation that would prove it wrong.”

Here Are Two Important Things About This…

First, a statement that is unfalsifiable is non-scientific, but that does not mean it is not relevant or that it is inaccurate.  One great example is the existence of atoms.  The ancient metaphysical and unfalsifiable idea of the existence of atoms led to modern theories about atoms that are falsifiable.

In other words, just because something does not fit into the scientific method does not mean it will not fit someday or that it is false.  It is very possible that things could be untestable by science but true.

Just as important, because something does fit into the scientific method and has withstood scientific testing, it does not mean it is true or even partially true.  It is not uncommon to discover that things we believe to be fact are either partially or completely incorrect.

In other words, we know a lot less than we sometimes think we do and we should always keep an open mind.

Is Sodium Really the Devil?

For example, sodium has been demonized for quite some time because it has been linked to high blood pressure and heart disease.  For many years, it has been an accepted “fact” that sodium intake must be reduced in people with high blood pressure and by most people in general.

Not too long ago, a study was published that suggested the important measure wasn’t sodium intake but the sodium/potassium ratio in an individual’s diet. This could mean that even a low-sodium diet could be bad if an individual’s diet is also low in potassium, or that a high-sodium diet may not be an issue if a person’s diet is also a high-potassium diet. ‘

But it gets better…  Now, a new study published in the journal Open Heart has added to the debate.  In this study, high-sugar diets were found to raise blood pressure. According to the study:

“Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of premature mortality in the developed world, and hypertension is its most important risk factor.  Controlling hypertension is a major focus of public health initiatives, and dietary approaches have historically focused on sodium.

“While the potential benefits of sodium-reduction strategies are debatable, one fact which there is little debate is that the predominant sources of sodium in the diet are industrially processed foods.  Processed foods also happen to be generally high in added sugars, the consumption of which might be more strongly and directly associated with hypertension and cardio metabolic risk.”   

The authors of the study went on to add, 

“Thus, while there is no argument that recommendations to reduce consumption of processed foods are highly appropriate and advisable, the arguments in this review are that the benefits of such recommendations might have less to do with sodium – minimally related to blood pressure and perhaps even inversely related to cardiovascular risk – and more to do with highly-refined carbohydrates.”

Here’s What Is VERY Important To YOU:

This may seem like a lot of “scientific” information.  It may also seem confusing.  Researchers are good at making things confusing!

Here is the scoop:  Foods loaded with processed, refined carbohydrates are not good for you.  Choosing to eat fewer refined, processed foods is one of the best ways to lose weight and stay healthy.  Period.  End of story.

Notice, I did not say to stop eating carbohydrates?  Many people are confused by this and think all carbohydrates are the same but nothing could be further from the truth.

There is a HUGE difference between highly refined carbohydrates and unrefined carbohydrates.

Sure, there is a raging debate over low-carb and high-carb diets but that is another conversation.  The first thing you must understand is highly refined carbohydrates are not good for you in any amounts.  How many unrefined and GOOD carbohydrates you should consume is a very different topic.

Does science always have the right answer?  No, it is not supposed to.  Science is a method, a process.  It is one part of how we know what we know.  It is not all of it.

We should use science as part of the process to make the best decisions about life and health.

With that being said, I will go out on a limb and say this:  If you want to be healthier – possibly much healthier – stop eating processed, highly refined foods

Are You SAD? Vitamin D Deficiency Might Be The Cause…

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is believed to affect up to 10 percent of the population.  SAD is a type of depression related to the changes in the season and can affect some geographic locations more than others.  The symptoms of SAD usually start in the fall and continue throughout the winter months.  Now, new research suggests that Vitamin D plays a HUGE role in whether or not a person develops SAD. According to Dr. Alan Stewart of the University of Georgia College of Education,

“Rather than being one of many factors, Vitamin D could have a regulative role in the development of SAD… We believe there are several reasons for this, including Vitamin D levels fluctuate in the body seasonally, in direct relation to seasonally available sunlight.  For example, studies show there is a lag of about eight weeks between the peak in intensity of ultraviolet radiation and the onset of SAD, and this correlates with the time it takes for UV radiation to be processed by the body into Vitamin D.” 

It is important to note that Vitamin D is involved in the synthesis of dopamine and serotonin and lower levels of both are linked to depression. This is especially important since many people now avoid the sun as much as possible out of fear or developing skin cancer. Clearly, exposure to sunlight is important for optimizing your health. But there is a big difference between getting too much sunlight (and getting sunburns) and taking an extreme position to get no sunlight at all. The tricky thing is determining what level of sun exposure is most beneficial for you. Factors like skin tone and geographic location drastically affect how much sun any given person should be exposed to. However, a vitamin D supplement may safely help increase your vitamin D levels, especially during winter months when sunlight exposure is extremely limited.

Don’t forget, if you ever have any questions or concerns about your health, talk to us. Contact us with your questions. We’re here to help and don’t enjoy anything more than participating in providing you natural pain relief.
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