Chiropractic Treatment for Wry Neck

19 Aug

Wry neck, also known as torticollis, is a painful condition in which the top of the head usually tilts to one side while the chin rotates to the opposite side. Torticollis can have several causes from infection (cold, flu, or otitis media, for example) to sleeping in a draft; however, the cause is usually unknown (idiopathic).

In a typical case, torticollis may resolve itself within four to six weeks, but with chiropractic care, cervical function can return to a more normal state much faster, often within a week. Chiropractic treatment for torticollis often includes stretching, in which manual cervical traction, spinal mobilization, and myofascial release techniques help to restore the lost range of motion and faulty posture. Once enough motion has been restored, a doctor of chiropractic may utilize spinal manipulation, which often hastens the recovery rate of torticollis. Chiropractors may also use physical therapy modalities and/or provide instruction on home-based exercises and other self-management strategies.

There’s a type of torticollis called congenital torticollis in which an infant is born with torticollis that either developed in utero or during the birth process. Current guidelines support prompt treatment for congenital torticollis versus taking a wait-and-see approach. One study found that treating infants with gentle manual therapy approaches at one month of age led to higher success rates than waiting until they were six months or older when substantially more care was needed to restore full range of motion with lower odds of success.

There is a less common but more serious type of torticollis called cervical dystonia, sometimes referred to as spasmodic torticollis, which is characterized by involuntary contraction of muscles in the neck that twist the head in a variety of directions. Cervical dystonia can occur at any age, but it’s more common among middle-aged women. While there is no known cure for the condition, there are case studies showing that cervical dystonia may respond to chiropractic treatment. In one such case study, a 59-year-old woman with an eleven-year history of cervical dystonia experienced a dramatic improvement in function (from 3/10 to 9/10 on a scale of 0 to 10, 10 being full function and 0 being no function) following a treatment regimen that included cervical spinal manipulation, reflex therapy, eye exercises, and vibration therapy.

 

This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all healthcare concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a healthcare professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.
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Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder

15 Aug

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and is caused when the smooth cartilage surface of an articulating/moving joint wears away until there is bone-on-bone contact that results in both loss of movement and pain. Although OA most commonly affects the joints under the greatest load (the hips and the knees), it can occur in any moving joint, including those that make up the shoulder.

Because cartilage lacks a direct blood supply, it relies on a process called diffusion in which nutrients are absorbed into cartilage when it’s compressed by movement. Anything that restricts the movement of the joint (like inflammation or injury) can slow or cut off its supply of nutrients, placing the tissue at risk for injury and degeneration.

When a patient presents for care involving OA of the shoulder, chiropractic treatment will generally focus on improving the motion of the affected joints with manipulation, mobilization, manual traction, manual massage, active release techniques, acupuncture, physical therapy modalities (such as ultrasound or electronic stim), nutritional counseling, and home-based exercises.

Here are some additional ways to self-manage osteoarthritis of the shoulder:

  1. Stay Active: Movement/exercise is the BEST way to keep joint cartilage nourished and healthy. Many people can manage the pain often without medication by simply pacing themselves and by staying active.
  2. Eat a Healthy Diet: Keep your diet balanced and emphasize foods that reduce inflammation or swelling like omega-3 fatty acids (fish oil), ginger, turmeric, Boswellia, and more.
  3. Reduce the Load on the Joints: This includes losing weight, as well as modifying job/lifestyle activities that routinely place force on the affected joints.
  4. Get Plenty of Sleep: Several studies show that getting too little or too much sleep each night can lead to poor outcomes. Aim for seven to nine hours of restful sleep.
  5. Use Hot/Cold Packs: This is a great way to reduce inflammation.
  6. Supplements: Consider glucosamine and chondroitin.

Generally, the more advanced the case, the longer it will take to achieve a successful outcome, if at all. That’s why it’s important to seek care sooner rather than later when you experience pain in the shoulder or any other part of the body.

 

This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all healthcare concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a healthcare professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.

Chiropractic Management of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

12 Aug

When someone is diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), there seems to be an automatic assumption that surgery is imminent or at least inevitable. However, treatment guidelines for CTS that are intended to be followed by ALL healthcare professionals ALWAYS recommend an initial course of non-surgical treatment, NOT jumping directly to surgery. Unfortunately, evidence-based treatment guidelines are not always followed, and many patients are not given an option for anything other than surgery.

The following is an excerpt from a 2017 Washington State CTS treatment guideline:

All of the following criteria must be met for surgery to be authorized:

  1. The clinical presentation is consistent with CTS
  2. The EDS [electrodiagnostic studies] criteria for CTS have been met
  3. The patient has failed to respond to conservative treatment that included wrist splinting and/or injection

Medical-based non-surgical care for CTS includes: neutral position wrist splints worn at night and (in certain cases) at times during the day (studies report that 30-70% of patients respond favorably within several months of initial wrist splint use); glucocorticoids injections into the carpal tunnel (these can provide short-term relief with about 50% of patients requiring surgery within one year); and forearm and wrist exercises.

Doctors of chiropractic often use a combined approach based on the patient’s unique case, which can include wrist splints and exercise training (as described above) along with manual therapies like manipulation and mobilization on the wrist and elsewhere along the course of the median nerve; physical therapy modalities such as laser therapy, ultrasound, and pulsed electromagnetic field; nutritional counseling, especially anti-inflammatory herbs like ginger, turmeric, and Boswellia; and ergonomic medications such as changing a workstation setup or the grip on tools used to perform job functions.

Studies show that, in most cases, mild-to-moderate CTS can respond to non-surgical approaches just as well as surgery (though without the potential side effects associated with going under the knife), which underscores the importance of seeking care for CTS as soon as possible.

 

This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all healthcare concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a healthcare professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.

Beliefs About Back Pain

8 Aug

Since the late 1980s, researchers have embraced the biopsychosocial model (BPS) to understand both the causative and prognostic factors associated with neuromusculoskeletal disorders, which includes back pain. In order to achieve the best possible outcomes for patients with back pain, it’s important to understand the role that factors outside of the biomechanical injury model play in both the injury and recovery processes. Unfortunately, there’s a lot of misinformation out there that can be detrimental to the patient.

In one study that included 130 low back pain (LBP) patients with persistent or recurring back pain, participants answered questions about the cause of their LBP, including what they’ve learned since receiving care. Their answers revealed that such patients see their LBP as: 1) due to the body being like a broken machine; 2) permanent; 3) complex; and 4) very negative. Nearly 9 in 10 patients (89%) indicated they learned these beliefs from healthcare professionals.

The study’s findings indicate that healthcare providers may be in the best position to educate patients about their condition. However, responses from 103 primary care physicians (PCPs) suggested that they considered biomechanical risk factors to be the most important short-term and long-term factors for a sudden episode of acute LBP.

When it comes to giving yourself the best possible chance of recovery from LBP, here are some things to keep in mind in addition to utilizing non-surgical treatments that are recommended by current guidelines, of which chiropractic care is an excellent choice: 1) Research has demonstrated that depression, anxiety, and self-limiting beliefs about future ability to work or do physical activity are psychosocial factors that are associated with poor outcomes.  2) Insufficient sleep and smoking are also lifestyle behaviors that can slow one’s recovery from injury, which includes low back pain! 3) Because movement is necessary to diffuse nutrients into cartilaginous tissue, it’s important to stay active during the recovery process to maintain joint health. Physical activity also keeps the muscles from deconditioning, especially the deep muscles that control posture.

Doctors of chiropractic are trained to approach treatment from a biopsychosocial perspective and to consider all factors that affect the patient’s chief complaint and quality of life. Through patient education, spinal manipulation, mobilization, exercise training, the use of modalities, and more, chiropractors can greatly help those struggling with back pain and other musculoskeletal conditions!

 

This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all healthcare concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a healthcare professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.

White Rice or Brown Rice or No Rice at All

29 Jul

In today’s world, consumers are inundated with contradicting news about foods that are good for them and foods that can be detrimental to their health. Rice is one such food. Is it good for you? Is it bad? Let’s find out…

In a 2019 study, researchers in India randomly assigned 169 overweight adults (aged 25-65 years) to consume meals that included white or brown rice twice a day, six days a week for three months. The research team used blood testing to measure glucose, insulin, HbA1c, insulin resistance, lipids, and inflammation. The results showed that those who consumed white rice had test results that suggested a higher risk of type 2 diabetes, while those who ate brown rice had blood test results that indicated less inflammation and a reduced diabetes risk.

In 2012 and 2014, Consumer Reports raised concern about the arsenic levels in US rice. In order to determine if rice consumption is associated with an increased risk for cancer, researchers evaluated data from several long-term databases that included dietary and health information involving 45,231 men and 160,408 women who were cancer-free at the start of the study and tested every four years for 26 years.

Overall, the data show that 10,833 men (23.9% of men) and 20,822 women (12.9% of women) developed cancer. Comparing participants who ate <1 serving of rice per week vs. those who ate ≥5 rice servings per week, there was NO significant difference or associations between those who did vs. those who did not get cancer, regardless of the type of rice, cancer type, BMI, smoking status, or ethnic background. Additionally, rice consumption was not associated with cardiovascular disease, which is another leading cause of death in the developed world.

Another interesting study reported that cooking brown rice under high water pressure increased the water absorbency of brown rice without nutrient loss.

Other studies have found that fermented brown rice and rice bran appears to reduce the risk of cancers of the colon, liver, stomach, bladder, esophagus, and lung. In animal models, fermented brown rice/rice bran was also observed to reduce tumor size, though this finding has yet to be confirmed in human subjects.

Doctors of chiropractic often encourage patients to live a healthy lifestyle, which includes eating more of the foods that are good for us and less of the foods that are not. So far, the science suggests that eating white rice in moderation may not hurt you and consuming brown rice may offer some additional benefits.

 

This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all healthcare concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a healthcare professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.

Reducing the Risk of Car Accident Injury

22 Jul

While doctors of chiropractic enjoy helping their patients get better, the preference is to avoid injury in the first place, and if that’s not possible, to reduce the risk for serious injury. This is especially important when it comes to car accidents, as whiplash associated disorders (WAD) injuries can persist for months to years and greatly reduce one’s ability to carry out their normal activities.

One of the most important steps you can take is to focus on the road while driving and eliminate distractions, which includes not texting while driving. In one study, researchers observed that even using hands-free functions increased the risk a driver would drift into another lane, drive too closely to the car in front of them, and be less responsive to changing road conditions. Other common distractions include fiddling with the radio, eating, reading (yes, people do this!), talking with other passengers (especially if you turn your head to look at them), and driving while intoxicated, while under the influence of legal/illicit drugs or medications, or while tired.

Strategies to stay safe on the road include taking regular breaks (if driving a long distance), keeping your eyes moving (check mirrors frequently), not speeding or driving faster than road conditions allow, following traffic rules, using your signals, avoiding night and bad weather driving, heeding caution signs, and keeping your car properly serviced (including making sure there is enough air in your tires and that your tires are in good condition). Additionally, it’s important to respond quickly to vehicle recalls. As they say, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure!”

Sometimes it’s not always possible to avoid an accident. Wearing a seatbelt can reduce the risk you’ll be ejected from the vehicle in the event of an accident (which almost certainly results in fatality) or suffer more serious injuries. Making sure your head rest is properly adjusted can also reduce your risk for a serious head/neck injury.

Automobile manufacturers continue to implement safety improvements in their vehicles. For example, a review of data between 1995 to 2016 supports that vehicle safety design improvements reduced the frequency of rollover crashes from 7% to 3.5% when comparing 1995-1999 vs. 2010-2016 model year vehicles, respectively. Starting in 1997, General Motors (GM) introduced high retention seats in their new model cars, SUVs, vans, and light trucks. A recent study compared the 1991 to 2000 Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) data to the 2001-2008 FARS data to evaluate the impact of high retention seats. The data show that in rear impacts, high retention seats reduced the fatality risk from 27.1% to 16.6% and the risk of serious injury by 70.2%.

If you’re involved in a car accident, even a low-speed collision, it’s important to be evaluated by a doctor of chiropractic to ensure any soft-tissue injuries that result are properly treated as soon as possible in order to reduce your risk for ongoing pain and disability.

This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all healthcare concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a healthcare professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.